verb

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Examples: 
sing, drive and write.

A verb is a word, or a group of words, which describe an action or a state.
Now, sing, drive and write are all verb because they are actions. But a verb can also be a state.
For example: love, know and have
Love, know and have are not actions, they are states. And they are verbs too.

A verb can be a word, or a group of words.
For example, in the sentence "I will win this time!", the verb is made of 2 words.

The word "verb" originally comes from the Latin word verbum, which means "word".

Person
Another important subject that will help you learn English verbs is the subject of person.

Now, what do we mean by that?

Each action (or state) has someone connected with it. In other words: Who? Who is doing it? Or, who is in that state?

We call it the "person."

When the verb shows an action or a state of the person speaking, we say the verb is in the first person.

In the following sentences the verbs are in the first person:

I go to school.

I like pasta.

We drink water.

When the verb shows an action or a state of the person you are speaking to, we say the verb is in the second person.

In the following sentences the verbs are in the second person:

You look pretty.

You sleep too much.

You play golf.

When the verb shows an action or a state of someone else, which is not present, we say the verb is in the third person.

In the following sentences the verbs are in the third person:

He is a good guy.

She has a garden.

It works fine.

They sing together.

Of course, just because we call it a "person" it does mean it has to be a real person! The action can be connected to an object, an animal, etc.

For example: The phone rings.

"Rings" is a verb in the third person.

Tense

In addition to person, each verb also has a certain time. In other words, when does it happen? Past, present or future? Is it complete or in progress? We call this the tense of the verb.

In short, English has 12 different tenses, which show when the action or state take place.

In the following sentences the verbs are in the PAST tense:

In 1999 I lived in Toronto.

Yesterday we met on the beach.

He left an hour ago.

In the following sentences the verbs are in the PRESENT tense:

They visit us often.

I feel great.

You have a car.

In the following sentences the verbs are in the FUTURE tense:

The cat will catch the mouse.

Father will be here soon.

We will come to the party.

Sometimes just saying when the action or state take place is not enough. We might also want to mention whether the action is complete, or in progress. This is called the aspect.

In other words, a verb can indicate any of the following:
1) When the action takes place, with no additional information.
2) When the action takes place, and that it is in progress.
3) When the action takes place, and that it is complete.
4) When the action takes place, that it was in progress and that it is finally complete.
Now, don't faint just yet! Some examples follow...

1) When + no additional data (simple tenses):

Kate walked home.
(only shows when: in the past, no extra data)

Kate walks home every day.
(only shows when: in the present, no extra data)

Kate will walk home tonight.
(only shows when: in the future, no extra data)

2) When + in progress (progressive tenses):

Yesterday at 5 o'clock Kate was walking home.
(shows when: in the past, and also indicates the action was in progress)

Kate is walking home right now.
(shows when: in the present, and also indicates the action is in progress)

Tonight at 9 o'clock Kate will be walking home.
(shows when: in the future, and also indicates the action will be in progress)

3) When + completion (perfect tenses):

Kate had already walked before 8 o'clock.
(shows when: before something in the past, and also indicates the action was complete)

Kate has walked for a long time.
(shows when: before the present, and also indicates the action is complete)

By midnight, Kate will have walked home.
(shows when: before the future, and also indicates the action will be complete)

4) When + in progress + completion (perfect progressive tenses):

Kate had been walking for 2 hours before she got home.
(shows when: before something in the past, and also indicates the action was in progress and later it was complete)

Kate has been walking for 2 hours.
(shows when: before the present, and also indicates the action was in progress and now it is complete)

By the time Kate gets home, she will have been walking for 2 hours.
(shows when: before the future, and also indicates the action will be in progress and then it will be complete)

Learn English Verbs – Final Words
English verbs are an important part of English. Learn English verbs well, and you are well on your way to mastering the English language.

But how can you do that?

In order for you to learn English verbs, you first need to underatand the basics of the subject, like the ones we covered in this section.

Then you should practice them until you know them very well.

Continue that way and gradually increase your vocabulary. Learn English verbs that are new to you and practice them in real life sentences!

Regular Verbs
A regular verb is a verb that follows this rule:

Past form of the verb = Present form of the verb + ed / d

For example, work is a regular verb because:

Past form of work = work + ed = worked
Dance is a regular verb too. That is because:
Past form of dance = dance + d = danced

We call the present form a base form, or V1 (Verb 1).

We call the past form V2 (Verb 2).

There is another form called V3 (Verb 3). That is the form that we use in the Perfect Tenses.
These are examples of Regular Verbs:

V1 V2 V3
help helped helped
open opened opened
stop stopped stopped
change changed changed

Irregular Verbs
An irregular verb is a verb that does not follow that rule.

For example, drink is an irregular verb because the past form of drink is drank, and not "drinked".

Go is an irregular verb too. That is because the past form of go is went, and not "goed".

These are examples of Irregular Verbs:

V1 V2 V3
take took taken
buy bought bought
eat ate eaten
give gave given
leave left left
am was been

The English language has a great number of irregular verbs!

The Verb To Be

The verb "to be" is one of the most common verbs in the English language. It has many different forms.

The forms of the verb "to be"

when? Who? Form Example
Base form be It can be simple
Simple Present I am I am here.
You are You are here.
He/She/It is She is here.
We are We are here.
They are They are here.
Simple Past I was I was here.
You were You were here.
He/She/It was She was here.
We were We were here.
They were They were here.
Simple Future I will be I will be here.
You will be You will be here.
He/She/It will be She will be here.
We will be We will be here.
They will be They will be here.
Progressive form being He is being unusual.
Perfect form been It has been fun.

The verb "to be" also has many different meanings.

The following are the most important ones.

The meanings of the verb "to be"
1. Exists.
There is a rabbit inside.
There is nothing in the fridge.
There is a problem...
There is a difference.

2. Happens.
The party is tonight.
The meeting is down the hall.
Come, it is over there.
3. Located.
She is at school.
She is home.
The food is on the table.

4. Shows identity.

She is Alexis and this is Bob.
He is a singer.
He is not a singer.

5. Shows a quality.

She is beautiful.
It is stinky.
This is dangerous.

The verb "to be" as an auxiliary verb
(helping verb)
Auxiliary verbs are verbs that are used together with the main verb of the sentence to express the action or state.

Main verb + auxiliary verb = complete idea

The verb "to be" can be used as an auxiliary verb to express ongoing (continuing) actions.

For example:

Anna is eating a sandwich.

"Eating" = the main verb.

"Is" = an auxiliary (helping) verb.

"is eating" (a complete idea) = the eating is IN PROGRESS.

More examples:

Kayla is walking home with her friends.

Justin and Ethan are watching a movie.

I am trying to get some sleep.

The verb "to be" in passive sentences
The verb "to be" is used together with the third form of the verb (V3) in passive sentences.

For example:

ACTIVE: I eat an apple.

PASSIVE: The apple is eaten.

"Eaten" = the main verb (in the third form – V3).

"Is" = an auxiliary (helping) verb.

"is eaten" (a complete idea) = the subject of the sentence (the apple) is affected by the action.

More examples:

People buy cars. --> Cars are bought.

Someone turned on the light. --> The light was turned on.

He will clean the house. --> The house will be cleaned. 

Progressive Forms of the verb "to be"
The progressive form of the verb "to be" is "being."

This means the action is ongoing (continuing).

Examples:

The little boy is being naughty.

She was being rude, but then she apologized.

They are being tricked.

Perfect Forms of the verb "to be"
The perfect form of the verb "to be" is "been."

This means the action is complete (finished).

Examples:

The little boy has been naughty.

She has been rude, but now she apologizes.

They have been tricked.

Examples sentences: 

I will win this time!